101st Anniversary of That Woman on the Wall

A garden is a delight to the eye and the solace for the soul. –Saadi

On December 22, 2018, the Gladys Inabinette Shoatz Community Sitting Garden Committee celebrates the 101st anniversary of the love, compassion, community, and strength of Gladys Inabinette Shoatz.

#GISCG #GISCSP

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Cursive Writing vs. Typing

I’ve been thinking about this topic for some time. As an educator, I come across many students who cannot sign their names in cursive. I also come across those who cannot read cursive writing. Although it is frustrating, as time trudges on, I am of the belief that while cursive writing is important, I do not agree that it is as important as many state.

Gajowski (Dec. 2016) argues that “our brains get activated in ways that aren’t activated when we type something. And this brain activation helps with recall when we are learning.” My argument against this is if children are trained to type at an early age, it improves their spelling. When one can touch-type instead of hunting-and-pecking, the brain is activated. I did not conduct any research regarding this last statement; however, when my children were younger, I ensured that each of them learned to touch-type.

It was a program back in the 1990s called “Mavis Beacon Teaches Typing”. This program taught children how to type through games and assessments. I bring this up because many people who may not embrace typing over cursive writing may not be as proficient in typing so they relive their experiences with typing and cursive writing.

As for me, I retain much more information through typing than writing. When writing, especially if it is an abundance of material, my hands cramp up. I also tend to make mistakes and I focus more on the mistake and miss out on what was stated. View the two videos below. One illustrates writing in cursive and the other illustrates writing the same information through typing.

If you compare the time frame to write this sentence to the time it took to type the same sentence, you will notice that it took twice as long to write the sentence than it did to type the same sentence.

Don’t get me wrong, I do agree that dexterity and being able to use fine motor skills are important, I just do not believe that cursive writing, or the lack thereof is as big a problem as it is portrayed. There are two arguments I hear consistently for cursive writing. The first argument is that people need to know how to sign their names. The second argument is that if students do not know how to read cursive, they will not be able to read primary sources, specifically, many of the important documents used throughout history.

My counterclaim for these arguments are as follows. First of all, from third grade on, teach students how to sign their names. Teachers should not accept any written work from students if their names are not written in cursive. This will improve over the years if all teachers required only the signature in cursive. Secondly, many of the primary sources have been typed and are in secure locations. What may manifest itself is that if students are signing their names in cursive in every course, the cursive might just rub off. Let’s discuss.

 

Bibliography

Gajowski, MA, Carrie (Dec. 13, 2016). Cursive Becoming Obsolete? in Fast Forward by         Scientific Learning. Retrieved from https://www.scilearn.com/blog/is-cursive-handwriting-still-important 12/12/2018

Celebrating the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Not only nonviolence, Dr. King also wanted improvement of education. Sun Ed High of North Broward has the pieces of the puzzle that will make the dream come true. We are providing students who thought they could not graduate the ability to not just graduate but to become whatever they want to be.

Check out this review of Mitchell Moore Park on Google Maps

https://goo.gl/maps/7cNk1Pkc3462

Everyday Black History – Carlota Lukumi

Life sometimes gets in the way. A few days passed us by, but alas, I’m baaack!! Was I missed? Was the everyday Black History missed? Well, I’m ready to rock-and-roll again.

Until recently, I’ve not heard of Carlota Lukumi. So, let me share a life of what I learned. If you know more, please share.

She is also known as La Negra Carlota. She was forced into slavery in Cuba after being kidnapped from West Africa as a child. In 1843, she led a raid that freed dozens of slaves from captivity. Does she remind you of anyone?

She was captured a year after the revolt began. However, she was able to liberate slaves from many different plantations in the area.

Learn more about Carlota and so many other women in Urban Intellectuals Black History Flash Cards Volume 2. Click here to visit my affiliate website for purchasing options.

Everyday Black History – Billie Holiday

I remember watching movies; going to plays; and learning about Billie Holiday growing up. Such an interesting and beauti ful woman with a great voice. She also had a lot of sadness.

She received four posthumous Grammy awards, for Best Historical Album. She, herself, was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame 1973.

Learn more about Billie Holiday by visiting my affiliate website here for purchasing options.

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Everyday Black History – Martin Delany

You learned about Harriet Tubman, Frederic Douglass, and Sojourner Truth; but, have you learned about Martin Delany? He was an abolitionist, journalist, physician, writer, and arguably the first proponent of Black Nationalism.

If you are or have ever been a member or interested in Black Nationalism, you have him to thank. He joined integrated militia to help defend the Black community against White mob attacks.

Learn more about Martin Delany and others by visiting my affiliate website. Click here for purchasing options.